How to Understand and Change Your Behavior?

How to Understand and Change Your Behavior?

Richard Pfau, with a doctorate in science education or an undergraduate degree in psychology, wrote Your Behavior: Understanding or Changing the Things You Do as a reaction to what he seems to be the current state of psychology. In his words, the psychological field today is "scattered and speculative".
How to Understand and Change Your Behavior?,How To Change Your Thoughts And Behavior Patterns For The Better, Want to Change Your Life? You Must Do This

Pfau's goal with Your Behavior is to integrate work from a variety of disciplines including psychology, sociology, anthropology, and biology into a coherent explanation for why we do the things we do, and to do so in a way that is accessible to both individuals and professionals. Throughout the book, she draws on the concept of cognitive control (PCT) to help students understand how they behave and how to change it.

Pfau did an excellent job of ordering and organizing his work. He begins by establishing the student "as an independent person," which includes the assertion that we have a survival rope. Therefore, he ensures that most of our behavior is designed to ensure survival and often happens without thinking.

Pfau explores the root cause of behavior from the cellular level to all levels of the environment and discusses how different levels come together in an incompatible system.

In life, most of us have "indicators," or things like goals, plans, or the way we think things should be. We change the way we behave based on our ideas of how it meets our expectations. A basic example would be something as simple as wearing a jacket when it is cold. Our body is responsible for maintaining high temperature and homeostasis. But it can also be very difficult. For example, the clues a person may have in his or her political or religious beliefs can lead to behaviors that bring clues to those beliefs.

We behave in such a way that our opinions have given us the answer to ensure that we are in line with our values, even if our behavior is ignorant. At times, we may even err on the side of caution. We are constantly in touch with our nature according to our ideas of our directions. Pfau gives a really interesting look to human behavior.

The first ten chapters provide an overview of perceptual control theory (PCT) and why people behave the way they do, including looking at us and others. Pfau designed the book in such a way that the reader could research as much as he wanted.

How to Understand and Change Your Behavior?,How To Change Your Thoughts And Behavior Patterns For The Better, Want to Change Your Life? You Must Do This

Each chapter begins with a brief summary and contains outstanding highlights with many boxes that provide examples of topics in the chapter, or details in depth of ideas. This has been very helpful as a review of what the concepts mean throughout the book. I don’t remember encountering PCT or autopoiesis before reading Your Behavior.

Each chapter concludes with a preview of the next chapter, giving us an idea of ​​the purpose of the book's educational process. There is an extensive list of references to continue reading at the end of each chapter, as well as endnotes that provide additional details about the text. Organization and presentation are very straightforward, well thought out, and very well presented.

I still disagree with Pfau's analysis of the current morality. He says the word "culture" is invisible, so statements such as "culture creates behavior" are meaningless or misleading, and cannot be guaranteed. But as people change from associating with their environment for life, cultures also change, and often because of the brevity of our lives, cultures (our interactions with our nature in a systematic way) change without our knowledge.

I think it might be "abstract" compared to "building." There is controversy over the fact that it is actually being built, which I think is not mentioned in this work. As I read this, I became intrigued by how the PCT would communicate with me, and perhaps with cultures, such as construction.

After giving a thorough understanding of the PCT and why we and others behave the way we do, the last two chapters guide us in analyzing our behavior, and how we can change it systematically.

Pfau calls the works of a few people about this, but the one who came up with me was John Norcross, who has been involved in the model of change that has taken place over the years. (Surprisingly, I did not find any model clues here.)

There are some very useful appendixes that include checklists and reference forms to help students analyze and build how to change their behavior. Pfau also discusses his weight loss and smoking habits.

This is the most complete work ever presented. Your Behavior is a great book for anyone interested in a change of behavior with a supportive perspective that includes a comprehensive program from the mobile level upwards.


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